Installing Bixenon HIDs in 99-04 Ford Mustangs

In this write-up we will be going over the installation of StangMods’ bixenon HID conversion kit for 1999-2004 Ford Mustangs. This kit will increase light output and offer a whiter light for added style.

Tools Required:

  • 8 MM or 5/16 Socket

First you’ll want to remove your stock headlamps from the vehicle. This process can be found through this link.  Once your headlamp lenses have been removed, lay your wiring harness along the battery area underneath the hood as shown below.

Run the longer end of the harness over to the passenger side area. It is not important to tuck it away neatlly at this moment.

Now move back over to the driver’s side. There are two O ring connections that need to be made. One is a power (red wire) and ground (black wire). Connect the red O ring terminal to the positive side of the battery. Next, connect the black O ring terminal to a good ground source. We chose the bolt on the inner fenderwell as shown below.

You’ll now be left with three connections to be made on the driver’s side. Tuck them down next to the battery and out through the opening behind the headlamp as shown below.

Route the passenger side harness as shown below.

You can connect the gound O ring for the passenger side to the bolt for the hood prop rod.

Now we will be preparing the bulb for installation. The bixenon bulb has a removable base that must be removed before installing it in the headlamp housing. Simply twist the base counter clockwise and it will be removed. Once the base is removed, place the bulb through the plastic locking collar as shown below.

You can now reattach the base and install the bulb in the housing as shown below.

The final step is to re-attach the plastic locking collar to secure the bixenon bulb in the housing as shown below.

There are three remaining connections to be made on the passenger side. They are all all a simple plug in procedure. Simply match up the corresponding plugs. The final step on the passenger side is to mount your ballast. We chose to mount it on the inner fender as shown below.

At this point, you can zip tie all of the passenger side connections in place. We chose to zip tie the harness directly underneath the radiator shroud as shown below.

 

Move over to the driver’s side to complete the installation. Plug the stock harness into the blue plug on the driver’s side as shown below. Keep in mind that the stock harness plug on the passenger side is not used.

Tuck the harness connection back through the opening as shown below. You can also tuck your driver’s side ballast back through this opening. It is not necessary to use mounting brackets to secure it as there is limited space for the ballast to move around.

Finally, complete your plug in connections as you did on the passenger side and tuck away the harness around the battery as shown below. Once you have the wires in their desired location, you can use zipties to secure them to existing OEM wires.

All thats left is to re-install your driver’s side headlamp and check the HIDs to ensure they come on.

You can find our selection of Mustang HID conversion kits here: http://www.stangmods.com/Mustang-HID-Lighting-s/61.htm

Dual Beam Bixenon HID Install Guide for 10′-13′ Mustangs

If you have a 2010 to 2012 Mustang that lacks the factory HID option you can add your own HIDs that look and perform a lot like the factory offering for a fraction of the price. In this how-to we will be installing the StangMods Dual Beam Bixenon HID Headlights in color temperature 6000K. Before we get into the actual instructions, we want to point out that these headlights are tinted and the tint will change the light output. If yours are not tinted the finished product will be brighter. Let’s get on with the install!

The first thing you need to do is pop the hood and get some light on your ride so you can see into the dark recesses under the hood. This car has an aftermarket radiator cover on it so yours may look different from this example. This is the first step though before going on to the next. Remove the battery cables from the battery since you are working with the cars electrical system. Take all safety precautions when working with any live electrical system.

Once you have the hood popped and enough light you start by removing the radiator cover so you can access the headlights under the hood. Removing the cover is easy and all you need to do is pull up on the black pushpins that lock the cover in place.

Once the radiator cover is removed, you can start by laying out the wiring harness that comes with the HID kit. The main power connector for the kit is designed to connect to the fuse block under the hood. Pop the cover on the fuse block and the large black nut where the power cable from the battery connects needs to be removed. You can then put the round ended power wire for the HID kit onto the stud, put the nut on, and tighten it back down. That is all you need to do for power to the HIDs.

The other wire you need to connect to get power for the HID headlights is the ground. We used the fender bolt near the passenger side headlight circled in red in the first photo below. We also routed the wire over to the other side of the car for the driver’s headlight at this point. Just lay the cable across the car being sure it won’t get pinched when you put the radiator cover back on later. You can see the black cable snaking across the radiator support in the second pic below, this pic was with the grill removed for the install of HID foglights.

Once you get the cable laid out. You will be able to see behind the headlights and as you can tell, it’s very tight back there. The orange plug you see here directly to the left of the windshield fluid reservoir is actually the blinker so don’t confuse it with the headlight which is a black and further down and more to the wheel well side of the car. If you find the fit is too tight for you to work you can remove the headlights to get better access, but that is not something we wanted to get into. To remove the factory headlight bulb from the headlight housing you give the large lock nut securing the bulb into the housing a twist and the bulb will pull out easily. The passenger side bulb comes out the same way and there is a bit more room on that side making it easier to see and work on the passenger side.

The factory headlight bulb has a grey end and a black lock nut, you can see what it looks like below with the top image being the factory set up and the image right underneath the StangMods HID bulb. You remove the actual connector from the factory bulb from the wiring harness of the car; you don’t just remove the factory bulb and plug the HID bulb in. The second picture below is the gray headlight harness plug with the factory bulb removed and the third pic is the HID bulb housing.  The StangMods HID kit has two pigtail wires running from the new HID bulb and housing that you will plug into the ballast. It’s important to note at this point that all of the ballasts are the same with this kit and you can just grab any one of them and use them for either side headlight or fog light. WARNING: DO NOT touch the glass surface of the HID bulb when installing. Doing so can cause premature bulb failure.

The pigtails that come off the HID bulb housing are keyed with connectors that will not allow you to hook them to the wrong plug on the ballast. As you can see in this shot, the passenger side headlight has a black and a red wire running from the HID bulb housing that connect to the white and blue wires running from the ballast. The HID pigtail will only plug into these two wires so you can’t get this wrong. The driver’s side connects the exact same way.

The wiring harness has a connector that connects to the ballast and while the ballast connection isn’t keyed, the connector on the ballast has a + and – mark and the wires that plug in are read for positive and black for negative making connection very simple. The factory headlight harness only plugs in on the passenger side to the HID harness. The plug for connection is easy to find and the factory headlight harness will only plug in one way. The driver side factory headlight harness isn’t needed. We taped ours up with electrical tape to keep it dry and wire tied it out of the way. If the headlights are all you are doing after you get all the connections made you can hide the ballasts and you are done.

Congratulations! You have installed your HID upgrade. Time to enjoy the increased light output and stylish color only HIDs can offer. Below is a photo of the kit working.

You can find our huge selection of HID conversion packages by clicking the following link: StangMods HID Lighting Store

Xenon High Intensity Discharge (HID) Tech Guide

In the world of automobiles, there are three main types of lighting used today; Halogen, Xenon (HID), and LED. Halogen is the most common and also the oldest and most tried technology available. Halogen bulbs are used in every aspect of daily life, not just on your car. Most household bulbs are Halogen, they are cheap to make and have been in use since the early 1900’s. Halogen bulbs consist of a metal filament that glows when electrical current is sent through it, and Halogen gas inside the bulb is used to help promote long life and durability.

Xenon High Intensity Discharge, or HID, is a newer technology with many benefits over a standard Halogen type bulb. Instead of using a metal filament that is prone to failure over long term use due to high heat, Xenon bulbs use Xenon gas to create light instead. A steady electrical current is sent through the gas causing it to ignite which gives you the brilliant white light we have come to love from Xenon. There are a few advantages to using Xenon over Halogen, one being the significantly longer life, another being a brighter white color vs. Halogen’s yellowish light. Xenon technology also uses less wattage than a Halogen bulb and therefore Xenon runs significantly cooler than it’s Halogen counterpart. This lower temperature reduces risk of fire and premature failure. The white light emitted by Xenon bulbs also better represent daylight and make nighttime driving easier on the eyes.

LED technology, or Light Emitting Diode, is the newest technology available to the automotive lighting world. These tiny bulbs come in many colors, sizes, and shapes. They use the least amount of power out of the three technologies and run cool by comparison. They also have the longest life of all the bulb types because there is no heat to cause component failure. The downside to LEDs is their brightness, they are rather dim by comparison, and in order to create a similar amount of light to that of a Xenon bulb, you would need dozens of the smaller LEDs.

So now that we know how they work and what the benefits are, it’s pretty easy to see why HID technology has really dominated the automotive market when it comes to headlamps. You get the brightest whitest light available in a package that outlasts Halogen and runs cooler. Another advantage to Xenon technology is the ability to offer different “Color Temperatures” with different kits for different applications to fine tune the perfect look for each and every customer.

Typically HID color temps range from 4300k all the way to 12,000k. Although you may assume a higher number means the light is brighter, it’s actually the exact opposite. A 12,000k HID bulb emits a blue almost purple light, however this blue light isn’t as effective when it comes to illuminating a night road. Many people assume that the higher the number, the brighter the light…this is incorrect. The higher the color temperature the less usable light you have to use. A 4300k tempurature will create a pure white light that peirces through the night, and is by far the best at lighting up a night road. The kelvin rating is for color, the output is measured in lumens. A 35W HID bulb outputs 3x the lumens that a 55W Halogen bulb would output. The image below shows the differences in color temps from 4300k to 12,000k.

If you are looking for an HID package that will not stand out too much and will offer better visibility without the blue tint, 4300k is the perfect temperature for you. This is a pure white light that is the closest to a Halogen bulb’s color output. 6000k is our most popular temperature as is adds a bit of stylish blue tint without reducing visibility. There is almost no difference in visibility between a 4300k HID and a 6000k HID. Once you get to 8000k and above you start losing a small amount usable light, but you get the stylish blue tint that many enthusiasts demand from their HID kits. No matter what you choose in terms of color temperature, it will almost certainly be an improvement over your stock Halogens. Not just in terms of light output, but in longevity as well.

Now that we’ve covered the technology and color temps, what about the hardware? Included with every HID kit are ballasts. The job of the ballasts is to regulate electric current through the Xenon gas within the HID bulb. Without the ballast, the current would vary and the light would flicker. Ballasts come in many shapes and sizes, and depending on the quality of the kit their materials will vary. Cheap kits use plastic ballasts that are prone to overheating and pose a fire risk. Quality ballasts are constructed of metal materials and will last significantly longer in the harsh environment of your engine bay.

Below are some customer images showing different color temperatures:

4300K

6000k

8000k

10,000k

For more information on StangMods HID kits, visit our store and view our HID selection at: http://www.stangmods.com/Mustang-HID-Lighting-s/61.htm – Here you will find kits for late model Mustangs as well as kits for Non-Mustang applications.

New HID Install Guide + Photos for 2011-10 Mustang

If you have a 2010-11 Mustang that lacks the factory HID option you can now add your own HIDs that look and perform a lot like the factory offering for a fraction of the price. The photos that follow are from the install of our StangMods Dual Beam Bixenon HID Headlight & Fog light Package for 10-11 Mustangs product code 00157 in color temperature 6000K.

HID color temperature typically ranges from 4300k to 10000k. A color temperature of 4300K has a “‘Pure White” color, 6000k, our most popular color temperature, has a slight blue tint. 8000K is primarily blue, and 10000K is blue/slightly purple. While a blue light output may be far more stylish than the standard factory halogen bulb’s yellow output, it’s important to note that the higher your HID color temperature, the less usable light you will experience at night.

At StangMods we make it easy to do this upgrade to your non HID 2010-11 Mustang. We provide lightning fast 2 day shipping on all HID orders, detailed installation instructions with photos for all Mustang applications, and provide a full lifetime warranty on all of our HID upgrade kits. HID kits get your Mustang noticed, not only giving your ride that premium look that will set it apart from the rest, but providing extra light for safe night driving.

If you’ve purchased an HID upgrade kit for your 2010-11 Mustang from StangMods, you can view the installation instructions HERE