Installing StangMods HID Foglight Conversion On 2010-2012 Mustang GTs

In this write-up, we go over the process of installing StangMods’ HID foglight kit in your 2010-2011 Mustang GT. We’ve gone over the write up for the headlight kit which can be found HERE.

The fog kit needs no wiring harness and uses the factory wiring harness plugs to get power to the ballasts. As you can see with the grill installed there is very little space behind the grill. It’s not possible to do this install without removing the grill. Removing the grill is the most difficult part of installing this HID kit. You have to remove two bolts that hold the grill on and then pop the grill loose from the retailing tabs all around the grill. Take care to not scratch your paint during the removal process.

Once the grill is removed, you can access the bulbs easily. You need to twist and remove the factory bulbs from the housing of the fogs and then install the HID bulbs into the housing by pressing them into the opening and twisting to lock. The HID bulbs again have a black and red wire coming off for connecting to the ballast.

Once you have the bulbs installed, you are ready to install the ballasts for your fog lights and connect the wires. The factory connector to the fog light plug connects to one of the connectors running off the ballast. This is the only confusing part of the install. The factory harness for each of the fogs has two different colored wires. On each side, the power wire is different color than the ground wire is. You have to be sure that the ground wire of the factory plug is aligned with the side of the HID harness that has the black ground wire. In my case, the ground wire was a grayish color with a yellow stripe. If you hook this backwards, the HID fog lights will not work. Be sure you test the fogs to ensure they work before you reinstall the grill.

The installation for both the right and left fog lights is the exact same. All of the connectors except the one where the factory fog light harness plugs in that I just mentioned are keyed. The other wiring connections can’t be installed wrong. Once you get the ballasts hooked up and the fogs work you can route the wires and reinstall the grill. I pushed the wires though a small opening between the radiator and the headlight assembly rather than wire the ballasts inside the radiator area. You can put the ballasts wherever the will safely fit and be secure.

After installing the wires, reinstalling the grill, and securing the ballast you are ready to reconnect the battery, put the radiator cover back on and you are done. The lights look really good and have lots more light than the factory halogen bulbs. Keep in mind when you look at the before and after photos below that my headlights and fogs are blackout tinted.

BEFORE:

AFTER:

¬†You’ll notice the HIDs provide a crisper, cooler-white light that makes night time driving safer and aesthetically pleasing.

You can find our many HID conversion kits for all years and models of Mustangs by clicking here: Mustang HIDs at StangMods.com

Xenon High Intensity Discharge (HID) Tech Guide

In the world of automobiles, there are three main types of lighting used today; Halogen, Xenon (HID), and LED. Halogen is the most common and also the oldest and most tried technology available. Halogen bulbs are used in every aspect of daily life, not just on your car. Most household bulbs are Halogen, they are cheap to make and have been in use since the early 1900’s. Halogen bulbs consist of a metal filament that glows when electrical current is sent through it, and Halogen gas inside the bulb is used to help promote long life and durability.

Xenon High Intensity Discharge, or HID, is a newer technology with many benefits over a standard Halogen type bulb. Instead of using a metal filament that is prone to failure over long term use due to high heat, Xenon bulbs use Xenon gas to create light instead. A steady electrical current is sent through the gas causing it to ignite which gives you the brilliant white light we have come to love from Xenon. There are a few advantages to using Xenon over Halogen, one being the significantly longer life, another being a brighter white color vs. Halogen’s yellowish light. Xenon technology also uses less wattage than a Halogen bulb and therefore Xenon runs significantly cooler than it’s Halogen counterpart. This lower temperature reduces risk of fire and premature failure. The white light emitted by Xenon bulbs also better represent daylight and make nighttime driving easier on the eyes.

LED technology, or Light Emitting Diode, is the newest technology available to the automotive lighting world. These tiny bulbs come in many colors, sizes, and shapes. They use the least amount of power out of the three technologies and run cool by comparison. They also have the longest life of all the bulb types because there is no heat to cause component failure. The downside to LEDs is their brightness, they are rather dim by comparison, and in order to create a similar amount of light to that of a Xenon bulb, you would need dozens of the smaller LEDs.

So now that we know how they work and what the benefits are, it’s pretty easy to see why HID technology has really dominated the automotive market when it comes to headlamps. You get the brightest whitest light available in a package that outlasts Halogen and runs cooler. Another advantage to Xenon technology is the ability to offer different “Color Temperatures” with different kits for different applications to fine tune the perfect look for each and every customer.

Typically HID color temps range from 4300k all the way to 12,000k. Although you may assume a higher number means the light is brighter, it’s actually the exact opposite. A 12,000k HID bulb emits a blue almost purple light, however this blue light isn’t as effective when it comes to illuminating a night road. Many people assume that the higher the number, the brighter the light…this is incorrect. The higher the color temperature the less usable light you have to use. A 4300k tempurature will create a pure white light that peirces through the night, and is by far the best at lighting up a night road. The kelvin rating is for color, the output is measured in lumens. A 35W HID bulb outputs 3x the lumens that a 55W Halogen bulb would output. The image below shows the differences in color temps from 4300k to 12,000k.

If you are looking for an HID package that will not stand out too much and will offer better visibility without the blue tint, 4300k is the perfect temperature for you. This is a pure white light that is the closest to a Halogen bulb’s color output. 6000k is our most popular temperature as is adds a bit of stylish blue tint without reducing visibility. There is almost no difference in visibility between a 4300k HID and a 6000k HID. Once you get to 8000k and above you start losing a small amount usable light, but you get the stylish blue tint that many enthusiasts demand from their HID kits. No matter what you choose in terms of color temperature, it will almost certainly be an improvement over your stock Halogens. Not just in terms of light output, but in longevity as well.

Now that we’ve covered the technology and color temps, what about the hardware? Included with every HID kit are ballasts. The job of the ballasts is to regulate electric current through the Xenon gas within the HID bulb. Without the ballast, the current would vary and the light would flicker. Ballasts come in many shapes and sizes, and depending on the quality of the kit their materials will vary. Cheap kits use plastic ballasts that are prone to overheating and pose a fire risk. Quality ballasts are constructed of metal materials and will last significantly longer in the harsh environment of your engine bay.

Below are some customer images showing different color temperatures:

4300K

6000k

8000k

10,000k

For more information on StangMods HID kits, visit our store and view our HID selection at: http://www.stangmods.com/Mustang-HID-Lighting-s/61.htm – Here you will find kits for late model Mustangs as well as kits for Non-Mustang applications.